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Cardiff 15000 arena

if it's about Cardiff.. Sport, Entertainment, Transportation, Business, Development Projects, Leisure, Eating, Drinking, Nightlife, Shopping, Train Spotting! etc.. then we want it here!
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DaiB

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostSat Aug 25, 2018 10:52 am

So out of interest, what IS the latest with the Cardiff arena? It's not as if Cardiff has a flawless track record in delivering this stuff?
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Kyle

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostSat Aug 25, 2018 11:03 am

DaiB wrote:So out of interest, what IS the latest with the Cardiff arena? It's not as if Cardiff has a flawless track record in delivering this stuff?


I was just about to post asking the same thing, and yes, you are correct about the track record, on a number of big projects.

I'm not gloating over the Bristol farce too much yet.

Wasn't the last related the council needing to make a decision over relocation? Surely they've had enough time on that already?
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DaiB

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostSat Aug 25, 2018 11:26 am

There has been talk of disposing of the County Hall site for at least 12 years, the latest 'final' plans for the arena location leave that as an open question, but definitely involve building on the Red Dragon Centre car park and reconfiguration of that site and Hemingway Road, which I imagine will involve some pretty hefty private sector negotiations. And there's been no new public info for months. I see absolutely no evidence that Cardiff is further down the path than Bristol. Quite the opposite really.
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Ash

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostSat Aug 25, 2018 12:03 pm

I think what's happened in Bristol puts the two cities in roughly the same place, tbh, whereas Bristol was some way ahead of us before the latest snafu.

To be fair, it's not that long since the announcement of the Bay location. It's totally possible that things are progressing well and we'll get an announcement before the end of the year. It's equally possible that bog all is happening!

We just don't know.
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Owen

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostSat Aug 25, 2018 2:21 pm

DaiB wrote:So out of interest, what IS the latest with the Cardiff arena? It's not as if Cardiff has a flawless track record in delivering this stuff?


It was last discussed at cabinet in Feb, where they decided on it being in the Bay. The document said it needed further work to form a delivery strategy to be presented in Spring/Summer. Red Dragon owners seemed very on board with a re-development, but guess negotiations need to happen with that. The other key factor was whether county Hall moves and that this would probably run alongside an estate review. Ideally hear something this autumn, but things always take longer than I would like them to
For me, I want county hall to move to help empty spot on callaghan square (no one else seems to want it) and county Hall + red dragon to form new arena and a modern red dragon centre.
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LocalLurker

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostTue Sep 04, 2018 7:50 pm

Bristol Arena will not be in the city centre

https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bris ... re-1968999

The luddites across the Severn living up to their reputation and not going through with yet another development. The idea is that the arena will go to Filton although this isn't set in stone, they may not get an arena after all. We are lucky in Cardiff in this respect of having a forward thinking council.

On a side note, I always liked the idea of having a Mayor to drive development forward. The exact opposite appears to be the case in Bristol. Maybe having your standard council IS the way forward.
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Lyndon

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostTue Sep 04, 2018 9:25 pm

Yeah, this is a classic example of why we shouldn't have elected executive mayors. Just one dickhead could set the city back years.
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Ash

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostTue Sep 04, 2018 10:10 pm

The trouble is elected mayors have limited terms and all want of them to leave their personal mark meaning that there's no continuity of policy. Each Mayor trashes their predesessor's projects and cancels them when possible.

London is a prime example of this. The Emirates cable car, the garden bridge, that orbital tower thing in Olympic park, Boris buses, vanity projects all.
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MattW

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostWed Sep 05, 2018 10:30 am

I didn't realise city Mayors actually had any power. I thought it was largely a ceremonial function like the Lord Mayor we have in Cardiff who basically turns up to open buildings etc. Years ago the Mayor was effectively the top boss similar to a Chief Exec.
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RandomComment

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Re: Cardiff 15000 arena

PostWed Sep 05, 2018 5:52 pm

MattW wrote:I didn't realise city Mayors actually had any power. I thought it was largely a ceremonial function like the Lord Mayor we have in Cardiff who basically turns up to open buildings etc. Years ago the Mayor was effectively the top boss similar to a Chief Exec.


It depends on what model of local governance is in force.

In somewhere like Cardiff the mayor is effectively a ceremonial role. What matters is the leader of the council and the cabinet.

However, where there are elected mayors, those mayors have executive power. London is the obvious example (Police, Transport, and strategic Development, Planning, Transport, Housing and Environmental issues). But it also includes the new metro Mayors (Greater Manchester, West Midlands, Merseyside, West-of-England - i.e. Bristol). And a few specific local authorities (e.g. Doncaster, Tower Hamlets).

There what happens is the Mayor has executive authority and appoints a cabinet (or deputy mayors with specific responsibilities). In London, the "London Assembly" then acts as a legislature - a bit like parliament or the Assembly. There are votes and committees for scrutiny. In individual councils with mayors, the council acts sort of like the legislature - and again committees are drawn from councillors. In the metro areas, like Greater Manchester, the cabinet is effectively chosen for the mayor - its the heads of the individual councils (e.g. Manchester, Salford, Stockport, etc.). The mayor can make some decisions on his/her own, but other times needs agreement of the council heads.

If it all seems a bit complicated - it is. Its because we have no common system across the country. A hotch potch of different ways of doing things.

But I think there are benefits of elected, executive mayors. They are certainly much more high profile than council leaders. While that can lead to grandstanding it can also help the public hold politicians to account. People find it easier to connect with one individual than with a whole administration. It could help make local voting more distinct from national voting - its depressing how council votes are treated as opinion polls for national politics. It can also give the elected mayor additional convening power and impact. Other agencies and organisations pay more attention to one (wo)man with a direct mandate and a fixed term - than a council leader who could be ousted any minute.
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